Archive for ‘Breakfast’

September 30, 2012

Cinnamon Roll Pancakes

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My daughter and my boyfriend’s two boys love cinnamon rolls and pancakes. Usually, I save cinnamon rolls for special occasions since they involved making dough, letting it rise and then getting up early the next morning to get them ready. Homemade pancakes are a weekend tradition for us, and a favorite among our kids. When I saw a recipe online for cinnamon roll pancakes I had to try them. First, I used my own pancake recipe, but you can make your favorite homemade recipe, or use a box mix. Then, I use the frosting I use for my cinnamon rolls, and then made a “filling” out of melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon.

To be honest, the first time I made these was on a whim on a weekday morning before school/work. Yes sometimes I’m that crazy. But they looked easy enough, and they were, just a bit of a mess for a weekday morning. Next time I will make the frosting and filling ahead of time.  You can make the frosting and keep it covered in the fridge. The filling you can make and keep in a plastic bag at room temperature. Then in the morning all you have to do is mix the pancakes and throw it together.

The kids were really excited to see a cinnamon roll pancake with frosting and all.  One of them even said “hey look, they are like pancakes on the bottom.”

Pancakes

1 1/2 c. flour

1T. sugar (my regular recipe has 3T but we are adding so much sugar already)

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/4 tsp. salt

2 large eggs

1 1/2 c. milk

2 tsp. vanilla

3T. melted butter

Mix first 4 ingredients. Then mix milk, eggs, and vanilla together. Then mix the milk mixture into the flour mixture and mix about 10 strokes. Then add butter and mix briefly just to combine. (over mixing the pancake batter will result in flat tough pancakes).

Filling

Allow the pancake batter to sit while you make the filling and the frosting.

1 stick of melted butter

3/4 cup brown sugar

1 T cinnamon

Mix all ingredients in a bowl.

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Then put the filling in a bottle (my preference, because it gives more control) or a plastic bag. You can cut the tip off the bag and squeeze onto the pancake.

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Then heat up a pan or a pancake griddle…I use a 1/2 cup measuring cup to pour the batter onto my griddle. I allow the batter to set just a little, then add the filling in a spiral starting from the middle of the batter to the outside. Perfect…

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Not Perfect…careful not to wait too long to add the filing and not get too close to the edge then you will have a spill…

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Oh and before I forget! Wipe your griddle down with a wet towel between each batch, it gets messy and sticky.

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Now for the frosting.  I made the frosting before I started cooking the pancakes so it was ready when the pancakes were still warm, kind of like warm cinnamon rolls right out of the oven with melty frosting.

Frosting

4 oz softened cream cheese

1 tsp. vanilla

1c. powdered sugar

3T. milk

Mix the cream cheese and sugar until crumbly.

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Then add the milk 1 T. at a time. You can adjust the consistency of your frosting by adding more milk if you’d like.

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Spread the frosting on the pancakes, just like a cinnamon roll.

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See how the frosting gets down into the crevices of the pancakes…yum!

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~Enjoy!

Amanda

August 30, 2011

School Snack Time

 

My daughter started Kindergarten this year! Yes, I am very excited about her being in school, probably as excited as my daughter. As a child, I loved school, especially the beginning of the year! Meeting new friends, teachers, organizing your new backpack and wearing those new clothes that you picked out weeks ago but only got to admire on hangers. A fresh start to a new year was exciting.

My daughter’s first day of kindergarten went smoothly, without emotional breakdown (not that I suspected my daughter would have any problems). She got to go to the “big kid” school, ride the “big van” at daycare and made a new friend. What an accomplished week for my little Kindergartener.  This year she goes to daycare before lunchtime at school so I do not have to make lunches, daycare provides lunch.  However, we do have to send a healthy snack for the morning at school.  So, my daughter and I sat down and made a list of healthy foods she likes and we made a quick reference guide when preparing snacks (I’m a list kind of person, I cannot live without them, they make sense of my world): carrots, apples with peanut butter, whole wheat saltines with peanut butter and jelly, cheese crackers, raisins, air-popped popcorn, fruit cups (homemade), and homemade granola bars.

You know me, if you read my blog, and I like to make everything from scratch. That is the only way to know, really, what is in my daughter’s food. So instead of store bought granola bars, I make homemade bars and send them to school with her. I pack them with high energy ingredients (do little kids really need more energy? yes, yes they do) and less sugar than in the store-bought bars. I use Alton Brown’s recipe – really anything he makes I trust, he’s the science guy of food.

GRANOLA BARS

(adapted from Alton Brown’s Granola Bars)

8 ounces old-fashioned rolled oats, approximately 2 cups

1 1/2 ounces raw sunflower seeds, approximately 1/2 cup

3 ounces sliced almonds, approximately 1 cup

1 1/2 ounces wheat germ, approximately 1/2 cup

6 ounces honey, approximately 1/2 cup

1 3/4 ounces dark brown sugar, approximately 1/4 cup packed

1-ounce unsalted butter, plus extra for pan

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

6 1/2 ounces chopped dried fruit, any combination of apricots, cherries or blueberries.

Other Add-ins: chocolate chips, marshmallows, peanut butter, cinnamon chips any combination your heart desires.

Nonstick cooking spray

Butter a 9 by 9-inch glass baking dish and set aside. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

In place of the first four ingredients, I used about 3-4 cups of my own homemade granola that was already made. If you are not using granola, spread the oats, sunflower seeds, almonds, and wheat germ onto a half-sheet pan. Place in the oven and toast for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

In the meantime, combine the honey, brown sugar, butter, extract and salt in a medium saucepan and place over medium heat. Cook until the brown sugar has completely dissolved.

Once the oat mixture is done, remove it from the oven and reduce the heat to 300 degrees F. Immediately add the oat mixture to the liquid mixture, add the dried fruit, and stir to combine. Turn mixture out into the prepared baking dish and press down, evenly distributing the mixture in the dish and place in the oven to bake for 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely. Cut into squares and store in an airtight container for up to a week.

Hope all of you out there enjoy this healthy snack!

February 6, 2011

Meyer Lemon Marmalade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meyer lemons are one of my favorites fruits, sweeter than traditional store-bought lemons with a floral smell to them. As my daughter explained, they smell like a flower. Fortunately, for me, my friend Charlie had some Meyer Lemons to share with me. Thank you Charlie! (Your marmalade is on it’s way!)

This recipe is from Simply Recipes. This is my first attempt at marmalade – mind you, I have never made jam or jelly before. Going into it I knew making marmalade would be a process and during the process I wished I had taken one of Linda’s canning/jam classes to boost my confidence. Nonetheless, here I am winging it on my own, recipe in hand, and pruned fingers (from preparing the lemons). Preparing the fruit took a lot longer than I anticipated. Throughout the whole process I was feeling a little unsure of my skills – and I was hoping I didn’t just waste 2 1/2 pounds of Meyer lemons.

  • 2 1/2 lbs of Meyer lemons (about 9 lemons)
  • 6 cups water
  • 6 cups granulated sugar

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You will need to go through the long process of cutting the lemons in half, then quarter each half. Peel off any of the membrane that is easy to get to, cut off the pith from the middle of the lemon, and remove any seeds setting all this aside to use to make pectin. Once you clean out the membranes, pith and seeds, slice the quarters into thin pieces of lemon (think how big of a piece of fruit you would want to eat). (Note: the portion of lemon segments to water to sugar is 1:1:1 so weigh your lemons)

FIRST STAGE OF COOKING

Place the seeds, pith, and membranes in a double layer of cheese cloth, tie it up into a bag to become pectin. Place the lemons, water, and pectin bag in a pot.

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This is the first stage of cooking. Bring the water to a boil on medium high heat. Cook the lemons until they are softened. 25-35 minutes. Test one of the lemons make sure they are soft and not the least bit chewy. Any chewiness and you need to cook them a bit longer.

Remove the pot from the heat, and remove the pectin bag to a bowl to cool until it is cool enough to touch. Squeeze the pectin from the bag and add it to the lemon mixture.

SECOND STAGE OF COOKING

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This is is the second and final stage of cooking – add the sugar to the lemon mixture and turn the heat back on to about medium-high and bring the mixture to a rapid boil. This is the stage where you have to be very careful not to have the heat up too high so the fruit doesn’t burn. Also, be careful not to over cook the marmalade otherwise you get a gooey marmalade instead of a jelly one – that is how mine came out – more gooey than I wanted.

The marmalade may take anywhere between 20-35 minutes at this point. After about 15 minutes start checking it often. I put 3 or 4 spoons in the freezer and had them read to check.

If you put the jelly mixture on the spoon and it spreads out and thins immediately it is not done yet. If it holds it shape when it hits the spoon and then wrinkles a little when you push it with your finger that means you are good to go! Remove the pan from the heat.

CANNING

Make sure you have some glass canning jars.

I washed all my lids and jars in the dishwasher and when they were done washing I put the jars on the cookie sheet and put them in a 200°F oven while my marmalade was in the second stage of cooking. (they should be in there at least 10 minutes before using).

Using a ladle (to ensure you have evenly dispersed lemons) pour the marmalade into the jars, leaving about 1/4” head space in the jar for a vacuum seal. Making sure your lids are dry and you wipe the rim of the jar clean with a towel or wet paper towel. Place the lids on your marmalade and let sit out on the counter overnight.

You will hear “pop” sounds as the vacuum seal is created.

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Makes 6-8 half-pint jars.

In the end, some were impressed but I did not like the marmalade as much as I hoped I would. A friend had some Blue Chair Jam, Lemon Marmalade that I tried and I did not much like that one either. There is a particular taste that I do not care for that I tasted in both my and the Blue Chair version– but you may love this! It sure does look pretty though!

February 3, 2011

Whole Wheat Pancakes

Well partly whole wheat but I fear using all whole wheat flour in the pancakes will be dry and heavy, but if you have a recipe that is not, please share! (I will try this recipe with all whole wheat and let you know how it is).

As always, I am looking for good recipes that freeze well for future use. Pancakes and waffles are excellent breakfast options that freeze well, and they are loved in my house. As you can see from the photo below we play with our food…IMG_6708-28

We made these pancakes Monday morning for breakfast and we had enough to freeze and use during the week. I love homemade pancakes topped with blueberries and syrup. Toss the blueberries in the batter if you like cooked blueberries – my daughter likes them fresh not cooked.

3/4 cup all purpose flour

3/4 cup whole wheat flour

2 tablespoon sugar

1/2 tablespoon baking powder (use 1 tablespoon if you like cakey pancakes)

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cup milk

2 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 stick melted butter

Whisk together the flours, sugar, baking powder and salt.

In a separate bowl whisk together milk, eggs and vanilla.

Pour milk mixture into the flour and stir about 10 stirs, then pour in melted butter and stir a few more times – but don’t over mix! Leave it lumpy otherwise you’ll end up with flat flappy pancakes.

Top with your favorite toppings – bananas, strawberries, blueberries, apples, peaches, syrup, powdered sugar, jam or preserves.

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January 16, 2011

Doughnut Muffins

(www.kingarthurflour.com)

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Batter

  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoons ground nutmeg, to taste (I reduced this from 1 1/4 KAF says to use)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 2/3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 cup milk (I substituted half ‘n half I was out of milk!)

Topping

  • 3 tablespoons melted butter
  • 3 tablespoons cinnamon and sugar (1/4 cup sugar 1T cinnamon)

1) Preheat the oven to 425°F. Lightly grease a standard muffin tin. Or line with 12 paper or silicone muffin cups, and grease the cups with non-stick vegetable oil spray; this will ensure that they peel off the muffins nicely.

2) In a medium-sized mixing bowl, cream together the butter, vegetable oil, and sugars till smooth.

3) Add the eggs, beating to combine.

4) Stir in the baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg, salt, and vanilla.

5) Stir the flour into the butter mixture alternately with the milk, beginning and ending with the flour and making sure everything is thoroughly combined.

6) Spoon the batter evenly into the prepared pan, filling the cups nearly full.

7) Bake the muffins for 15 to 17 minutes, or until they’re a pale golden brown and a cake tester inserted into the middle of one of the center muffins comes out clean.

8) Remove them from the oven, and let them cool for a couple of minutes, or until you can handle them. While they’re cooling, melt the butter for the topping (this is easily done in the microwave).

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9) Use a pastry brush to paint the top of each muffin with the butter, then sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar. Or simply dip the tops of muffins into the melted butter, then roll in the cinnamon-sugar.

10) Serve warm, or cool on a rack and wrap airtight. Store for a day or so at room temperature.

Yield: 12 muffins.

December 26, 2010

Cinnamon Rolls

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Merry Christmas everyone! Hope everyone had a Christmas shared with great family and friends, and filled with lots of cheer and great food!

My Christmas was awesome – lots of really great food, time with my wonderful family and cooking! My daughter made out this year with a Leapster AND a Wii from Santa– we spent some time “Just Dancing” and working off some of the effects of our holiday binging, which we’ll need after this recipe.

When we were kids, my mom would make us cinnamon rolls on Christmas morning. Unbeknownst to her, it became a tradition in my brother’s, and my, mind. A year or two back we didn’t have cinnamon rolls for Christmas breakfast and my brother was hugely disappointed. Considering I had not ever made homemade cinnamon rolls, now was the perfect time to try it out. Since my daughter was born I have hosted Christmas at my house, this usually includes Christmas Eve dinner, Christmas breakfast and lunch. This year we had Christmas Eve dinner (Cuban Braised Beef), breakfast, snacks and the usual Prime Rib Roast with scalloped potatoes, green beans with bacon, and homemade brioche rolls.

The credit to the great cinnamon roll recipe goes to Ree Drummond and her book, The Pioneer Woman’s Cookbook, the recipe is also online at her website http://thepioneerwoman.com/ – a really great website…she’s pretty darn creative. (however I cut her recipe in half – her recipe made 50 rolls! Holy moly I did not need that many).

2 c. whole milk (I used 2% it worked fine)
1/2 c. vegetable oil
1 c. sugar
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (1 pkt of yeast)
4 cups (plus 1/2 cup extra, separated) All-purpose flour
1 t. (heaping) baking powder
1 t. (scant – just less than 1t.) baking soda
1 T. (heaping) salt
Melted butter (to spread over the dough)
1 c. granulated sugar
Cinnamon to sprinkle generously over the dough

Mix the milk, vegetable oil and sugar in a pan. Scald the mixture (heat until just before the boiling point). Turn off heat and leave to cool 45 minutes to 1 hour. When the mixture is lukewarm to warm (I prefer 100-115° for yeast bread), sprinkle in the package of Active Dry Yeast. Let this sit for a minute. Then add 4 cups of all-purpose flour. Stir mixture together. Cover and let rise for at least an hour.

After rising for at least an hour, mix together the 1 more cup of flour, the baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir mixture into the dough together. (At this point, you could cover the dough and put it in the fridge until you need it – overnight or even a day or two, if necessary. Just keep your eye on it and if it starts to overflow out of the pan, just punch it down. Let the mixture sit at room temperature about 30-minutes before you roll it out).

When ready to prepare rolls: Sprinkle rolling surface generously with flour.  Form a rough rectangle with your hands. Then use a rolling pin to roll the dough thin into a rectangle (roughly). Drizzle 1/2 to 1 cup melted butter over the dough and spread to cover all the dough. Sprinkle 1 cup of sugar over the butter followed by a generous sprinkling of cinnamon.

Now, starting at the opposite end of the long side, begin rolling the dough in a neat line toward you. Keep the roll relatively tight as you go. Next, pinch the seam of the roll to seal it.

Spread 1 tablespoon of melted butter in a seven inch round foil cake or pie pan. Then begin cutting the rolls approximately ¾ to 1 inch thick and laying them in the buttered pans. Using a neat trick I have seen in lots of recipes (and because it cut much easier than a knife) I used dental floss. By sliding the floss under the roll, then crossing the floss over the roll and pulling the floss tight cutting all the way through the cinnamon roll. The cut is fast clean and easy. A knife was much more difficult! Any other thin string would work, but floss is all I had. It worked well and did not leave any minty flavor on the dough.

Let the rolls rise for 20 to 30 minutes, then bake at 400 degrees until light golden brown, about 15 to 18 minutes. You can adjust your oven temperature if the rolls brown too fast.

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Choose a Frosting:

CREAM CHEESE ICING (pictured)

(adapted from Peter Reihnhart’s Artisan Breads Everyday)

3/4 block of cream cheese, room temperature
1 c. powdered sugar
1/4 cup melted butter
1 t. vanilla
1/8 t. lemon extract

 

Mix together all ingredients listed and stir well until smooth. It will be spreadable. Spread frosting generously all over the cinnamon rolls.

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REGULAR ICING (from Peter Reihnhart’s Artisan Breads Everyday)

16oz. powdered sugar
1/4 c. milk
1/8 c. melted butter
1 t. lemon extract or vanilla
pinch of salt

Mix together all ingredients and stir well. The mixture will be thick, but pourable. Spread all frosting/icing over the cinnamon rolls generously – this makes them better. The longer this icing sits the more gooey the rolls become.

This will be our family’s new holiday tradition…

December 9, 2010

Pancakes

 

Cinnamon Chocolate w/Powdered Sugar

My 4 year old daughter loves pancakes on Saturday mornings. It’s a ritual in our house. She likes to help mix the ingredients and then patiently waits while the first hot pancakes come off the griddle so she can add butter and syrup all by herself. She’s Ms. Independent these days, you know. Since we make pancakes so often I have tried many different recipes. So many pancakes come out super cakey and I like mine a little thinner. When I was younger and lived with my friend Kim she would make the best pancakes. She and her kids would butter up the pancakes sprinkle some powdered sugar over them then roll them up and eat them. That has been my favorite way to eat pancakes ever since. So the cakier the pancake, the more difficult it is to roll it up! So for this recipe I have noted some adjustments to make those cakey thick pancakes, if you like. This recipe is an adaptation of a Food Network kitchen recipe that was in a pull out booklet in a Food Network magazine.

My Basic Pancake Recipe

1 1/2 c. flour

1T. sugar (my regular recipe has 3T but we are adding so much sugar already)

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/4 tsp. salt

2 large eggs

1 1/2 c. milk

2 tsp. vanilla

3T. melted butter

Mix first 4 ingredients. Then mix milk, eggs, and vanilla together. Then mix the milk mixture into the flour mixture and mix about 10 strokes. Then add butter and mix briefly just to combine. (over mixing the pancake batter will result in flat tough pancakes).

Cinnamon Chocolate Batter

1.            Heat a griddle or large pan over medium high heat.

2.                  Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Set aside

3.                  In another bowl whisk together the milk, eggs and vanilla

4.                  Stir the milk mixture and melted butter into the flour mixture. Do not over mix you will end up with flat tough pancakes there will be lumps resist the urge to get    them out.    

5.                  Using a ladle pour pancake batter onto the griddle and allow to cook until the pancake is bubbly and drying around the edges. Flip and cook another minute or two.

6.                  Serve with butter, maple syrup, powdered sugar, whipped cream, preserves, jam, fresh fruit, or any of your favorite toppings.

 Creativity!

Now to show off your own creative side and add combinations you like such as raspberry and chocolate, fresh fruit chunks, mashed banana and blueberries or any of my tested recipes below. Like cupcakes, pancakes are fairly easy to alter with your favorite flavors. Think oatmeal too! (that is another flexible breakfast item you can add flavor to with pretty healthy ingredients.

Pumpkin Pie Pancakes: Add ¼ cup of pumpkin puree, 1tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp ground ginger and a pinch of nutmeg. Decrease the milk to 1 1/4 cup. 

 Cinnamon Chocolate Pancakes: add 3T of your favorite unsweetened coco powder and a 1tsp of cinnamon to the flour. (****these are my favorite****)

 Maple, Cinnamon and Pecan: 3T real maple syrup to the wet mixture and 1 tsp cinnamon to the flour, toss in some finely chopped pecans.

Lemon – Add lemon extract instead of vanilla and a 1tsp of lemon zest (the peel finely grated)

June 22, 2010

Peaches and Cream Oatmeal

Peaches ‘n Cream Oatmeal

As a kid, the “‘n Cream” oatmeals from the packets were always my favorite. At the last Farmer’s market I got some fresh peaches (white and regular) which needed to be used up. I decided to try making some peaches and cream oatmeal. It’s Fantastic!

My version of peaches ‘n creme oatmeal came out better tasting than the packets – surprise surprise right! Anything homemade can not only be healthier, but better tasting. You can’t beat big chucks of fresh (not dehydrated) peaches and fresh cream (not powdered). Just cannot be beat!  (try this recipe with frozen or canned fruit if what you like is not in season). However, I cannot stress the difference between foods you buy in a grocery store and those foods purchased locally straight from the source! Grocery stores have to pick fruits and veggies so early just to make sure they are ripe for the store, but I am convinced that is sacrafising flavor SO much. For example I buy peaches from the store they are hard, dry, and essentially tasteless when compared to a peach I buy from the farmer’s market, which is juicy, sweet and smells so much more fragrant.  If you haven’t compared, please do, you’ll look at your fruits and vegetables differently (my mouth is watering thinking about a nice freshly picked ripe peach). My dad and stepmom always told me how things from their garden are so much better tasting than from the store, I didn’t think it was possible – oh but it IS! 

4 cups water
1 cup steel cut oatmeal
(or use other oatmeal and cook according to the directions for that particular cereal)
1/2 heavy whipping cream
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup diced peaches (w/skins on)

(Additional Ingredients: you can add flaxseed, 10-grain cereal, or any other heart healthy grain you like to use. I use 1/4c. 10-grain Bob’s Red Mill Cereal and bump the water by 1/4c. )

Bring the 4 cups of water to a boil, then add the steel cut oats and stir. Allow the oats to boil for 5 minutes, then reduce the heat a simmer for 30 minutes. At about the last 10 minutes add the cream and finish simmering for 10 minutes.

Stir in the peaches and brown sugar. Allow the oats to sit a few minutes to soften the peaches.

If you use 5-minute oats get the water boiling and then add the heavy cream when you add the oats. If you use regular oats, add the heavy cream halfway through cooking.

May 23, 2010

Farmer’s Market Scrambled Eggs


Here in Carson we are fortunate to have an Early Farmer’s Market this year.  Considereing our Spring weather this year – I would say we are VERY fortunate. Yesterday, I took my first of many trips to the market this season. I got some fantastic early spring cherries, lettuce, baby carrots, asparagus, onions, garlic, and eggs. There is just something so great about the smell of freshly picked onions, it’s a smell you just don’t get from store bought. (My dad grows onions in his garden – along with a load of other fruits and veggies and whenever I’m lucky enough to get some onions I savor the smell – my dad lives in another state so sadly I cannot go raid his garden as often as I’d like!)

Use your favorite fresh vegetables from the Market and add them to your morning scrambled eggs.  Items like squash and tomatoes tend to be a bit on the wet side, pre cook them a bit before adding them to your eggs, or let them sit in a strainer for a bit to expel some liquid. Sometimes I add a tablespoon of cream cheese (to every 3 eggs) when scrambling my eggs, for and extra creamy texture, you do not taste the distinct flavor of cream cheese, but you will definitely notice a yummy difference in your eggs.

With my fresh ingredients I made some fresh scrambled eggs with bacon and asparagus (I also love mushrooms)….

3 eggs
2 strips of bacon, torn

4 asparagus spears, diced

1T butter
1T olive oil
1/4 c colby/jack shredded cheese
salt and pepper

Dice asparagus into bite-sized pieces and cook in butter and oil. My bacon was already cooked so I just tore it and added it with the asparagus just as the asparagus was done cooking.

Lightly beat eggs with salt and pepper. Add the eggs to the asparagus and bacon. Stir constantly over medium-low heat until eggs are just set. Remove to a plate and sprinkle with cheese. Tada! YUM!

May 17, 2010

Bacon-Pecan Waffles

Okay get ready for these! These are not your everyday, weight watching waffles. Thare the full o’ fat hold-nothing-back waffles and they ROCK! So try them out at least once!

Sprinkle 12 strips of bacon with brown sugar and rub the sugar to cover the entire strip

Cook at 400 for about 20 minutes until bacon is crispy. Cool then crumble (or coarsley chop).

Waffles
1 3/4 c. flour
2t. baking powder
2T. sugar
1t. salt
2 eggs
1 1/2 c. milk
6T. melted shortening
4T. melted butter
1 c. candided bacon
1/2 c. chopped toasted pecans

Mix all ingredients together until it creates a batter.

Cook with a waffle iron until crispy and cooked through.

Top with bacon and pecans and maple syrup.

I got this recipe from a pull-out booklet in a Food Network Magazine. The FN magazine puts out these little booklets for various food, this month was pancakes and waffles. The booklet provides a great basic recipe then provides variations.

The basic Waffle recipe:
2 c. flour
4 t. baking powder
2T. sugar
1 t. salt
2 eggs
1 1/2 c. milk
5T. melted shortening
4T. melted butter

Mix all ingredients togethether. Cook in a wffle iron until crisp.