Archive for ‘Pork’

September 5, 2011

Easy 5-step Baby Back Ribs

RIB FAIRY DUST (Just for those guys out there…)
3T. Kosher Salt
3T black pepper
2T brown sugar
1T paprika
2T garlic powder
1T onion powder
2t. mustard powder
dash of cayenne (or more if you like the heat)

Easy Baby Back Ribs

While these ribs do take a couple hours to cook, they are simple and do not require much attention or preparation.

1.  Pull off the membrane from underneath each rack of ribs and cut each rack in half.

2.   Coat the ribs evenly with the spice rub, making sure to get both sides.

(At this point you can place the ribs in a glass baking dish cover the ribs and allow them to sit overnight. Or you can move on to the next step.)

3.  Wrap each rack in foil.

(place one piece of foil on the bottom and one on top. Crunch the sides together, leaving room for any steam to move around in the packet.)

4.  Bake for 1 1/2 hours @ 325 degrees.

(Place the ribs in a glass baking dish or on a baking sheet so any drips are not caught by the bottom of your oven)

5.  Once your ribs are done, remove them from the foil.  Finish directly on the grill until both sides are crisp and the rub starts to sizzle.

(If you like barbecue sauce on your ribs, add the sauce during this step. With the grill on med-low, add sauce to the top side of your ribs, close the lid and cook for a 2-3 minutes. Turn and coat the bottom half of your ribs, close the lid and cook a few minutes more. Repeat this step until you have a good layer of caramelized barbecue sauce on your ribs. (2 or 3 times).)

Some people par boil their ribs, but here my opinion why to avoid this method…boiling meat pulls the flavor out of the meat and into the water. Boiling  meat is for making rich Stocks, not to barbecue meat – would you boil a great Ribeye? Remember, tender meat comes from meat that is cooked low and slow over indirect heat, not from the boiling process. Have you ever cooked anything too long in the crock pot and found it was dried out although liquid was in the pot? Yep liquid can dry out meat. It also pulls the flavor from your meat, that is why most roasts call for wine, tomato sauce, or stock to add flavor to the meat while cooking low and slow.

However, If you insist on the boil method, I can attest that ribs do come out tasty, but think how much tastier they could be cooked in their own juices? 

-Enjoy

Amanda

January 25, 2011

Asian Pork Noodle Soup

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So my kitchen organization and keeping items on hand in the freezer has really paid off! When, on Sunday, my chicken was unuseable, I had to readjust my weekly menu plan. Chicken Noodle Soup was on my list to use up the left over roasted chicken, so that had to be changed too. On Monday we ate the Cornflake Crusted Chicken Tenders. Tonight I pulled out some left over Roasted Pork Shoulder that was in the freezer.  When it comes to pork in soup, I just feel it should be with Asian flavors. So I decided to make it Asian Noodle Soup instead of Chicken Noodle Soup.

Some time ago I made an Asian pork soup soup, and regrettably I didn’t write the recipe down.  So I winged it tonight and took notes. This list of ingredients may sound long, but don’t get discouraged the soup comes together really fast! I would have liked to add cabbage to this soup too, so if you have it, shred some up and toss it in – it’s good!

2 carrots
2 stalks of celery
1/2 onion
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon Sriracha
8 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup Kikkoman Noodle Soup Base
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 cups cooked shredded pork shoulder
1 – package of ramen noodles
3 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup chopped cilantro

Dice celery, onions, carrots, and garlic. Cook this mixture on medium heat for about 10 minutes until the vegetables are soft. Stir often so the onions and garlic don’t burn.

Stir in the sesame oil, Sriracha, broth, soup base, and soy sauce. Bring the mixture to a rolling boil and let boil 5 minutes. Then add the noodles and cook 3 minutes or so.

Garnish with thinly sliced green onion and chopped cilantro.

January 19, 2011

Pan Roasted Pork Saltimbocca

Thomas Keller’s book Ad Hoc at Home is a great book for home cooks who really want to go above and beyond cooking just to eat. You don’t find the complexity from Keller you would anticipate. I was impressed to see Keller is down to earth and not so engulfed in his executive chef status and he can relate to those of us at home. Basic techniques every chef – home or professional should know, are shared in the book. It’s a great book (seems that has been my thing lately – books! So here is a recipe using one of those “basics” Pan Roasting! And this a weeknight friendly meal.

Pan roasting uses two techniques – sautéing and roasting. This technique is good for cooking a thicker piece of meat in a shorter amount of time (sounds to me like a fantastic weeknight cooking method!).   Searing the meat seals in the moisture and finishing it off in the oven cooks the meat the rest of the way through, more evenly than pan frying would.

2T Canola oil  (Canola oil has a higher smoking point than veggie oil and olive oil and flavor is mild)
Thick cut pork chops

For each Chop (1 chop per person):
1 slice of prosciutto, 1 sage leaf and a 1 inch slice of Fontina cheese 1/4 of an inch thick, or a larger thinly sliced piece.

Sauce– 2 chops double for 4 chops 
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup heavy cream
1T flour
1tsp white wine vinegar
pat of butter

(You can make a balsamic vinegar sauce instead, omit the cream and white wine and just use the pan drippings, and balsamic vinegar, butter, salt and pepper – simmer the chops in the sauce – pictured below).

Set out pork chops and salt and pepper on both sides. Let sit for 30 minutes before cooking while heating the oven to 350°.

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Slice a 1 inch slit in the fat side of the chop. Keeping the opening only about an inch, use a small sharp knife to cut a pocket inside the chop, big enough to hold the stuffing.

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Roll up cheese and sage in the prosciutto and stuff the rolls into the pocket.

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Heat the canola oil in a sauté pan (oven safe no nonstick or plastic parts) over medium high heat until the oil is good and hot. Sear the chops on all sides about 3-4 minutes each side until you have some nice sear action on your chops.

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Finish the chops off in the oven for 10-15 minutes until an instant read thermometer reads 170° (well) 165°(medium well).

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Remove the chops from the sauté pan and cover with foil. Add the wine to the sauté pan and reduce. Add cream, vinegar, salt and pepper. Finish off with a pat of butter. Place the chops over noodles or rice with roasted asparagus, drizzle sauce over chops and asparagus and finish off with some coarse sea salt.

If that doesn’t make your mouth water, I’m not sure what will…