Archive for ‘Chicken’

January 25, 2011

Cornflake Crusted Chicken Tenders

So my dinner menu had to be changed a bit this week – the whole chicken I bought was no good. My garage fridge may have had something to do with it. So I am going to have to push out the chicken noodle soup to later in the week. For tonight I made the cornflake chicken strips (pictured below with garlic potato wedges).

Most often to get crispy chicken strips, they are fried and unhealthy, and while they are oh so good, they aren’t something you can eat all that often. And any you buy in the store, or even at restaurants,  are full of preservatives or pressed chicken – ick! But it is probably one of the things most kids opt for when out to dinner. I know chicken strips are one of my daughter’s favorites so I knew I wanted to make a good crunchy homemade version, full of flavor and not bland covered in flour that is not well seasoned.  Cornflakes are a great coating for chicken and keep crunchy when you bake them.   As with fried chicken season the coating generously with spices and salt and pepper, otherwise your coating will be bland.

1 pound of chicken breasts or tenders
1/3 c. parmesan
1 1/2 c. finely crushed plain cornflakes cereal (or ½ c. bread crumbs and ½ c. cornmeal)
1/4 cup flour
1 tablespoon onion powder
1/2 tablespoon garlic powder
salt and pepper
2 eggs
4T. melted butter

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and line a baking sheet with foil.

Put the cornflakes in a plastic bag and press out all the air and seal the bag. Then toss the bag on the floor and step on it until the flakes are good and crushed (you can use a rolling pin or food processor too). Mix together the flakes, flour, onion and garlic powder and season generously with salt and pepper.

Mix butter and eggs. Slice chicken breasts into thin slices (or using tenders) and coat with the egg mixture then dip the chicken in the cornflake mixture.

Place the chicken on the baking sheet and cook for about 15-20 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through.

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December 12, 2010

Waldorf Salad

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With the holiday season in full force, many of us start to see an increase of the scales! OH NO! To counteract all the season treats I like to eat, I try to make my daily meals on the lighter side. It’s the holiday season after all and I want to enjoy all the goodies that you only get once a year. Most of my meals include fruits and veggies and low fat meats (chicken and pork) and then I get to have fun at parties and family dinners.  Here is a very simple recipe and it helped me use up the rest of the rotisserie chicken I bought to make chicken noodle soup.  Instead of mayonnaise I used 2% plain greek yogurt and I was surprised that I liked it because I don’t usually like the yogurt substitution. (Maybe I will start trying it more often). Enjoy!

2 cups cooked chicken, diced

1/2 apple (I used Fuji for the sweet/tartness with a crispy texture)

1/2 cup red grapes, halved

1 celery, sliced thin

1 green onion, thinly sliced

1/4 cup slivered almonds (pecans or walnuts work too)

2T blue cheese

1/2 cup 2% plain greek style yogurt (you can use mayonnaise as well)

1T red wine vinegar (or lemon juice)

1tsp kosher salt

  1. Dice the chicken and apples. Slice the grapes in half. Slice the celery and green onion. Toss it all in a bowl with slivered almonds and blue cheese.
  2. Mix together the yogurt, vinegar and salt. Pour over the chicken mixture and toss.
  3. Serve with whole lettuce leaves. Spread chicken mixture over a lettuce leaf, roll up and eat!

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September 20, 2010

Chicken Noodle Soup w/Homemade Noodles

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There is something about the smell of onion, celery, and carrots cooking (“mirepoix”) that is comforting and soothing to the soul. The combination is used as the base for so many comfort foods like soups, stews and stocks. The combination is usually 50% onion and 25% each of carrots and celery.  Other vegetables and garlic can be used as well. In the culinary world there is a name for that but I will save you the details.  Even though we are still in 80 degree weather, I am feeling Fall in the air.  Last weekend was the last Farmer’s Market and that is when I really know Fall is coming. Fall is my favorite season, so my motivation is really kicking in. So far I have received a few requests for Fall friendly recipes, so I figured I should start now.  So here is the first Fall recipe of the season. Chicken noodle soup is a classic so why not start with that? 

1/2 white onion, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
2 carrot, diced
2T butter
1 spring thyme
2T Italian parsley, finely chopped (plus more for garnish)
1 clove garlic
4c chicken stock (I use “Better than Bullion” according to the jar plus 1 extra tsp, if I don’t have homemade chicken broth)
2 bullion cubes (use only if you use homemade chicken broth)
2c. cooked shredded chicken (rotisserie chicken works well or left over roasted chicken)
1c. Noodles (see recipe below)
1/4 c heavy cream

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Make the noodles and lay out to dry a bit. I usually make the noodles an hour or so before.

Saute the mirepoix (celery, onion and carrots) onion is translucent. Add garlic until fragrant.  Add the thyme, bullion and broth.  Bring to a boil then simmer for 20 minutes.

Add the shredded chicken and noodles and simmer for 8 minutes. Add the heavy cream, stir and turn off the heat.

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Top with with shredded parmesan cheese and roughly chopped Italian parsley. Serve with some yummy crusty artisan bread and salted butter.

NOODLES – this recipe makes enough for two batches of soup
2 c. flour
¾ t. salt
1 egg
1/2c. milk

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Mix the flour and salt. Lightly beat the egg then make a well in the flour and pour the milk egg mixture in the middle. Gradually incorporate the flour into the milk mixture. You will have to use your hands to knead the dough at the end.

Roll out the dough on a floured surface into a large rectangle about a 1/4 inch thick. I find a pizza cutter works really well for this part, cut the dough into long skinny strips,then cut noodles to about an inch in length.